Touch Typing

            Touch-type Read and Spell (TTRS)

Individuals who struggle with a learning difficulty can benefit from touch typing, particularly in the case of Dysgraphia which makes writing by hand painful. Students with Dyspraxia often have trouble with fine motor skills that can make holding a pen difficult and forming letters impossible. In both cases it is often recommended that writing be done on a computer using a touch-typing approach.

People with Dyslexia may also find touch typing beneficial. Dyslexia impacts on reading, spelling, and writing abilities and makes it difficult for individuals to split words into their component sounds. Taking a typing course like TTRS entails repeated exposure to language and involves muscle memory in learning the spelling of high frequency words. The TTRS program further exercises phonics skills through visual and audio prompts.

With schools closing for indefinite periods of time, there is an even greater need for students and teachers to communicate through electronic means. This has further underscored the benefits of learning to type. Students need typing skills to communicate with teachers about schoolwork, complete online work, and participate in virtual learning activities.

As we approach the final term of school this year, a number of places will be available on the course due to the success of so many students who managed to complete the course during the last lockdown. While it is still not safe to hold classes after school, I continue to deliver this valuable course via Zoom using Breakout Rooms. Class size limited to three students. If you are interested in learning how TTRS can help your son/daughter build self-esteem, learn how to touch-type while improving their reading and spelling, contact Carol Pitcher on 087 2868910 – castleknockttrs@gmail.com for details of a FREE TRIAL.

 

TESS Return to School FAQsTusla – Child and Family Agency

The Child and Family Agency was established on 1st January 2014 and is now the dedicated State agency responsible for improving wellbeing and outcomes for children.
www.tusla.ie/tess/faqs/

Below are a series of frequently asked question which  Tusla have issued and may be of use to you. In the event of any further questions arise parents should contact their school in the first instance or their local TESS office.

In general, if a student is medically certified as being at Very High Risk then they are excused from attending school and where they are engaged in remote learning provided by the school, they shall be marked present in the roll book.

All other categories of non-attendance at school will be marked absent on the roll book as per usual, without exception. This includes students who are NOT deemed to be in the Very High Risk category and may be engaging in remote learning.

Please get in touch with info@saintbrigids.ie.ie or with your child’s teacher if you are worried about the return to school.  Continue reading “TESS Return to School FAQsTusla – Child and Family Agency”

Good Morning

Good morning boys and girls…..what a beautiful day!!

How was your weekend ?

I didn’t do too much….apart from….playing basketball…..throwing a javelin….playing bowling….oh and I found a really weird musical instrument in one of the teacher’s classrooms. I think it’s from Australia….I’m nor sure what it’s called so perhaps you could find out and let me know. Its makes a cool sound when you blow into it!

Skittle expert
javelin thrower
Basketball player