Head Lice

Every September we get the usual outbreaks of head lice in our school. If there is evidence of nits or lice in your child’s class we will send a notification to you via the Aladdin connect noticeboard  Please do not ignore it and assume your child is immune. The only way to eradicate lice is if everyone checks and treats accordingly. If a child is infected and is not treated the whole class will be reinfected again.
Some frequently asked questions about head lice are answered here by Bug Busters
False True
Wet combing doesn’t work.
  • The success of wet combing depends on the choice of comb and method of use.
  • Bug Busting wet combing is the only clinically evaluated method proven to work for the detection  and cure of an infestation.
There is no need to check that a treatment has worked when using products which kill lice in two doses a week apart.
  • The product may kill the lice but not the eggs.
  • A louse may be ready to leave the head in 6 days after hatching, so always check on day 5; some eggs may hatch between doses and some on days 9,10 and even 11, so check again on day 12.
After using a single dose product, relax, because that’s the end of the infestation!
  • It is particularly difficult to kill louse eggs. Always check for baby lice on day 5 and again on day 12 after using a treatment.
People who spread lice are not bothering to treat their hair.
  • This is not always the case as many people are using products claimed to eradicate infestations completely, which, in fact, do not. They may spread lice unsuspectingly.
Fine tooth combing in dry hair is as good as wet combing to detect lice.
  • The most reliable way to check is to wet comb because soaking wet lice stay still. In dry hair lice move quickly away from disturbance.
Itching is the first sign of lice.
  • Itching may take weeks to develop after first catching lice.
  • Some people never itch.
Head lice can be seen at a glance.
  • Head lice are difficult to see as they usually stay close to the scalp and remain hidden.
  • The best way to find lice is to use a Bug Buster comb according to the instructions.
Any fine comb will do for detecting lice.
  • No, the choice of comb is crucial to success. The Bug Buster comb is unique with a deeply bevelled edge on the teeth, ideal for slipping under lice in the hair roots. It has the optimum tooth spacing to trap newly hatched lice while still allowing free movement through the hair.
  • Rounded teeth on metal and other plastic combs can slip over lice leaving them undetected.
  • Lice are difficult to see in metal combs and can be inadvertently combed back onto the hair.
  • Many plastic combs are too flimsy and allow hair and lice through the teeth.
Head lice are the same as nits.
  • Head lice are often referred to as nits, but, in fact, these are the empty eggshells which remain glued to the hair after lice have hatched.
If you have nits in your hair, you need to treat.
  • No, the presence of nits does not prove that there are still lice on a head. These are the empty eggshells which remain glued to hairs after the lice have gone.
  • Nits are whitish in colour and become more noticeable as the hair grows.
  • Hairdressers often turn away clients with nits unnecessarily.
  • If you use the square-faced Nit Buster comb in a Bug Buster Kit according to the instructions, it will remove nits painlessly.
Lice can transfer to another head soon after hatching or at any stage during their life-cycle.
  • Lice will transfer to another head when full-grown, having completed their last moult. This can be 6 days or more after hatching.
  • Younger lice tend to remain on the head where they have hatched.
  • Full-grown lice mate. The female then begins to lay eggs glued singly to individual hairs where the warmth of the scalp will incubate them; this is often near the roots.
  • The female produces an average of 56 fertile eggs after a single insemination, laying at the rate of approximately 5-6 eggs per day.
Head lice prefer clean hair.
  • Head lice are happy on any head of hair, clean/dirty, short/long, straight/curly.
  • They feed solely on blood by biting the scalp.
Head lice jump, fly and swim.
  • Head lice cannot fly, jump or swim.
  • Head lice climb through the hair. They hold on with the claws at the end of their six legs.
Disinfect clothing, cuddly toys and furnishings

and don’t share hats and scarves.

  • There is no need to do this as the only lice that wander or fall off the head are dying.
  • On the other hand, stray hairs left in brushes and combs should be cleaned out (see below)
Ordinary combing damages/kills lice “break their legs and they won’t lay eggs”
  • Head lice that are caught in combs and brushes are rarely damaged. If a louse is clinging to a stray hair in a brush or comb, it can be returned to the head unhurt at a subsequent stroke.
Head lice are only found in school children.
  • Head lice are a community and family problem, but about 80% of cases affect school-aged children, the 4 – 16 year olds.

 

Scarlet Fever in 4th Class

 

There has been another confirmed case of scarlet fever in 4th class. It is therefore a possibility that children in the 4th classes may have been exposed. Please read the following advice from the HSE.

What is scarlet fever?

 Scarlet fever is a scattered red rash and high temperature caused by bacteria (Group A streptococci). Occasionally these bacteria can cause kidney or heart complications. Prompt treatment with an antibiotic usually prevents these complications. Treatment will also prevent spread to others.

What are the symptoms of scarlet fever?

 A scattered red rash that is often most marked in the creases of the joints and over the stomach. It usually blanches (goes white) when pressed on. The skin may feel rough to the touch, sometimes described as feeling like sandpaper. Someone with scarlet fever will have evidence of a streptococcal infection somewhere, usually in the throat or sometimes in the skin.

What should I do if I think my child has it?

 If your child develops any of these symptoms bring him/her to your GP for examination. Tell the doctor that another child in the school has scarlet fever. The doctor will prescribe an antibiotic for your child. It is important that your child takes the full course of medicine.

Can my child stay in school?

 Your child can return to school when he/she is well and has finished one full day of antibiotic treatment.

What can I do to prevent spread of infection at home?

 The bacteria are spread through contact with nose and mouth secretions so:

•  Wash hands thoroughly after wiping nose.

•  Wash hands thoroughly before preparing food.

•  Wash dishes well in hot soapy water.

•  Do not share cups, straws, spoons, eating utensils etc.

Foot and Mouth Disease

December 14th 2018
Dear Parent or Guardian,
There has been a case of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Junior Infants and your child may have been exposed. The
following are commonly asked questions about the disease.

What is hand, foot and mouth disease?
This is a disease caused by a group of viruses which usually affects young children. It causes blisters on hands and feet and
mouth ulcers inside the cheeks and on the tongue. They may also have a sore throat and high temperature. These symptoms
last for 7–10 days.

How long are children infectious?
Children who are ill are infectious. Also they may carry the virus in their faeces for many weeks after they have recovered and
so can continue to pass on infectio

Can you catch it more than once?
Yes, but children who are ill during an outbreak at school or nursery are unlikely to get it again during the same outbreak.

How long should children stay away from school?
Children who are unwell should be kept off school until they are feeling better. Keeping children off school for longer than this
is unlikely to stop the virus spreading. There may be other children in the school who appear well but are spreading the virus.

How is it spread?
The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, and is also found in the faeces of infected children. Some children infected do not
have symptoms but can still pass the virus on to others.
Is there any treatment?

Is there any treatment?
There is no specific treatment for hand, foot and mouth disease – it is usually a mild and self-limiting illness. If a child feels
unwell paracetamol may help. Antibiotics and creams or ointments for the blisters are not effective. Children recover just as
quickly without them.

Is it the same as foot and mouth disease in cows?
No. A completely different virus causes foot and mouth disease in cows.

Is it dangerous?
No. All make a full recovery.

What is the incubation period?
Symptoms start 3-5 days after exposure to the virus.

How can spread be prevented?
Since the virus is found in faeces, scrupulous attention must always be paid to hand washing after using the toilet.

Thank you for giving this your attention. If you have any further questions please contact your GP.
Yours truly,
Denis Courtney
Principal

Foot and Mouth Disease

There has been a case of hand, foot and mouth disease in Junior Infants  and your child may have been exposed. The following are commonly asked questions about the disease.

What is hand, foot and mouth disease?

This is a disease caused by a group of viruses which usually affects young children. It causes blisters on hands and feet and mouth ulcers inside the cheeks and on the tongue. They may also have a sore throat and high temperature. These symptoms last for 7–10 days.

Is it dangerous?

No. All make a full recovery.

Is it the same as foot and mouth disease in cows?

No. A completely different virus causes foot and mouth disease in cows.

How is it spread?

The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, and is also found in the faeces of infected children. Some children infected do not have symptoms but can still pass the virus on to others.

Is there any treatment?

There is no specific treatment for hand, foot and mouth disease – it is usually a mild and self-limiting illness. If a child feels unwell paracetamol may help. Antibiotics and creams or ointments for the blisters are not effective. Children recover just as quickly without them.

What is the incubation period?

Symptoms start 3-5 days after exposure to the virus.

How long are children infectious?

Children who are ill are infectious. Also they may carry the virus in their faeces for many weeks after they have recovered and so can continue to pass on infection.

How long should children stay away from school?

Children who are unwell should be kept off school until they are feeling better. Keeping children off school for longer than this is unlikely to stop the virus spreading. There may be other children in the school who appear well but are spreading the virus.

How can spread be prevented?

Since the virus is found in faeces, scrupulous attention must always be paid to hand washing after using the toilet.

Can you catch it more than once?

Yes, but children who are ill during an outbreak at school or nursery are unlikely to get it again during the same outbreak.

 

Foot and Mouth Disease

We normally have a few cases of Foot and Mouth Disease  every year. Please read the following information.

What is hand, foot and mouth disease?

This is a disease caused by a group of viruses which usually affects young children. It causes blisters on hands and feet and mouth ulcers inside the cheeks and on the tongue. They may also have a sore throat and high temperature. These symptoms last for 7–10 days.

 

Is it dangerous?

No. All make a full recovery.

 

Is it the same as foot and mouth disease in cows?

No. A completely different virus causes foot and mouth disease in cows.

 

How is it spread?

The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, and is also found in the faeces of infected children. Some children infected do not have symptoms but can still pass the virus on to others.

 

Is there any treatment?

There is no specific treatment for hand, foot and mouth disease – it is usually a mild and self-limiting illness. If a child feels unwell paracetamol may help. Antibiotics and creams or ointments for the blisters are not effective. Children recover just as quickly without them.

 

What is the incubation period?

Symptoms start 3-5 days after exposure to the virus.

 

How long are children infectious?

Children who are ill are infectious. Also they may carry the virus in their faeces for many weeks after they have recovered and so can continue to pass on infection.

 

How long should children stay away from school?

Children who are unwell should be kept off school until they are feeling better. Keeping children off school for longer than this is unlikely to stop the virus spreading. There may be other children in the school who appear well but are spreading the virus.

 

How can spread be prevented?

Since the virus is found in faeces, scrupulous attention must always be paid to hand washing after using the toilet.

 

Can you catch it more than once?

Yes, but children who are ill during an outbreak at school or nursery are unlikely to get it again during the same outbreak.

 

Thank you for giving this your attention. If you have any further questions please contact your GP.

Yours truly,

 

Denis Courtney

Scarlet Fever

April 24th 2018

 

There has been a confirmed case of scarlet fever in 2nd class. It is therefore a possibility that your child has been exposed. Please read the following advice from the HSE.

What is scarlet fever?

Scarlet fever is a scattered red rash and high temperature caused by bacteria (Group A streptococci). Occasionally these bacteria can cause kidney or heart complications. Prompt treatment with an antibiotic usually prevents these complications. Treatment will also prevent spread to others.

What are the symptoms of scarlet fever?

A scattered red rash that is often most marked in the creases of the joints and over the stomach. It usually blanches (goes white) when pressed on. The skin may feel rough to the touch, sometimes described as feeling like sandpaper. Someone with scarlet fever will have evidence of a streptococcal infection somewhere, usually in the throat or sometimes in the skin.

What should I do if I think my child has it?

If your child develops any of these symptoms bring him/her to your GP for examination. Tell the doctor that another child in the school has scarlet fever. The doctor will prescribe an antibiotic for your child. It is important that your child takes the full course of medicine.

Can my child stay in school?

Your child can return to school when he/she is well and has finished one full day of antibiotic treatment.

What can I do to prevent spread of infection at home?

The bacteria are spread through contact with nose and mouth secretions so:

  • Wash hands thoroughly after wiping nose.
  • Wash hands thoroughly before preparing food.
  • Wash dishes well in hot soapy water.
  • Do not share cups, straws, spoons, eating utensils etc.
  • Do not share toothbrushes.

Thank you for giving this your attention. Your GP will be able to answer any further questions that you might have concerning scarlet fever.

Yours Sincerely,

Denis Courtney

 

Scarlet Fever Warning

 

March 6th 2017

 

Dear Parent or Guardian,

There has been a confirmed case of scarlet fever in Senior Infants. It is therefore a possibility that your child has been exposed. Please read the following advice from the HSE.

What is scarlet fever?

Scarlet fever is a scattered red rash and high temperature caused by bacteria (Group A streptococci). Occasionally these bacteria can cause kidney or heart complications. Prompt treatment with an antibiotic usually prevents these complications. Treatment will also prevent spread to others.

 

What are the symptoms of scarlet fever?

A scattered red rash that is often most marked in the creases of the joints and over the stomach. It usually blanches (goes white) when pressed on. The skin may feel rough to the touch, sometimes described as feeling like sandpaper. Someone with scarlet fever will have evidence of a streptococcal infection somewhere, usually in the throat or sometimes in the skin.

 

What should I do if I think my child has it?

If your child develops any of these symptoms bring him/her to your GP for examination. Tell the doctor that another child in the school has scarlet fever. The doctor will prescribe an antibiotic for your child. It is important that your child takes the full course of medicine.

 

Can my child stay in school?

Your child can return to school when he/she is well and has finished one full day of antibiotic treatment.

 

What can I do to prevent spread of infection at home?

The bacteria are spread through contact with nose and mouth secretions so:

  • Wash hands thoroughly after wiping nose.
  • Wash hands thoroughly before preparing food.
  • Wash dishes well in hot soapy water.
  • Do not share cups, straws, spoons, eating utensils etc.
  • Do not share toothbrushes.

 

Thank you for giving this your attention. Your GP will be able to answer any further questions that you might have concerning scarlet fever.

 

Yours Sincerely,

Denis Courtney

 

Staying in at Break

We have a very small first aid room and it’s purpose is to attend to minor injuries which occur in the yard.  We appreciate their may be times when children need to remain indoors at break.  However children with minor colds and snuffles should either be at home, if sick or should wrap up well and go out to play. We are currently over run requests for children to stay indoors and we do not have the space or staff to safely run a large sick bay . If it is essential your child remain indoors please send a note to the class teacher.

Hand Foot and Mouth Disease

What is hand, foot and mouth disease?

This is a disease caused by a group of viruses which usually affects young children. It causes blisters on hands and feet and mouth ulcers inside the cheeks and on the tongue. They may also have a sore throat and high temperature. These symptoms last for 7–10 days.

Is it dangerous?

No. All make a full recovery.

Is it the same as foot and mouth disease in cows?

No. A completely different virus causes foot and mouth disease in cows.

How is it spread?

The virus is spread by coughs and sneezes, and is also found in the faeces of infected children. Some children infected do not have symptoms but can still pass the virus on to others.

Is there any treatment?

There is no specific treatment for hand, foot and mouth disease – it is usually a mild and self-limiting illness. If a child feels unwell paracetamol may help. Antibiotics and creams or ointments for the blisters are not effective. Children recover just as quickly without them.

What is the incubation period?

Symptoms start 3-5 days after exposure to the virus.

How long are children infectious?

Children who are ill are infectious. Also they may carry the virus in their faeces for many weeks after they have recovered and so can continue to pass on infection.

How long should children stay away from school?

Children who are unwell should be kept off school until they are feeling better. Keeping children off school for longer than this is unlikely to stop the virus spreading. There may be other children in the school who appear well but are spreading the virus.

How can spread be prevented?

Since the virus is found in faeces, scrupulous attention must always be paid to hand washing after using the toilet.

Can you catch it more than once?

Yes, but children who are ill during an outbreak at school or nursery are unlikely to get it again during the same outbreak.

If you suspect your child has  any symptoms please consult your GP.

Flu Outbreak

Dear Parents,

Over the last week and again today, we had large numbers of children with flu like symptoms coming to school. Some were too sick to stay in school and had to be collected before the end of class whilst others struggled to remain for the full day.

The National Director of Public Health, Dr. Kevin Kelleher and the three children’s hospitals have all expressed concern about the rapid spread of flu in schools and other places where large numbers of people congregate together.  In a joint statement issued Thursday, the following was said:

“Our advice is any child who gets flu- like symptoms should stay at home, rest, drink plenty of fluids and parents should use over the counter remedies like paracetamol to relieve symptoms. If parents are worried about their child’s breathing or fluid intake or if any young child or infant is in one of the high-risk categories, they should contact their G.P.”

The Department of Education has endorsed the HSE’S advice on not sending children who are experiencing flu like symptoms to school.

In order to prevent the further spread of flu in our school we would ask all parents to take note of this advice and keep sick children at home.

 

Thank you for your co-operation.

Yours sincerely,

Denis Courtney

Principal