1916 with Lego

Pupils from 3rd class in Sunday’s Well Boys School in Cork have made a superb stop-frame animation of the events surrounding the historic date using Lego

The 1916 Rising

The 1916 Rising

The Easter Rising lasted just seven anarchic days yet it is marked as one of the most tumultuous and significant events in Irish history.

Sixteen men associated with leading this revolution were executed within weeks. Hundreds were killed and thousands more arrested and interned at jails in England and Wales.

The Rising left iconic buildings in Dublin’s city centre razed to the ground with British rule in Ireland in a state of irreconcilable civil and political chaos.

Click on the images to visit some Easter Rising Information Sites

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 17.50.57

The 1916 Rising was an armed rebellion against British rule in Ireland that began on Easter Monday and lasted a week.

Read More

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

Screen Shot 2016-01-16 at 17.02.30

The events of the week from April 23 to 29 in 1916 are still shrouded in myth, confusion and astonishment as the 100th anniversary approaches.

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

Screen-Shot-2014-08-05-at-12.47.18In 1916 the General Post Office was the communications centre of the country. It was the headquarters of the Post Office with the main sorting office for letters in it and also the Central Telegraph Office which looked after telegrams. It linked all of Ireland together and connected Ireland with Britain which was important since Ireland and Britain were then one United Kingdom. The GPO was also a large and imposing building in Dublin’s city centre and for the 1916 rebels, a symbol of British control in Ireland.

Read More

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

FT5S-Thomas_Clarke_the_brave1

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising, the rebellion for Irish independence that changed the course of Ireland’s history which began on Easter Monday, 1916. In recognition, here are 50 facts – some well known, others more obscure.

Read More

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

The Military Archives has been the official place of deposit for records of theDefence Forces, the Department of Defence and the Army Pensions Board since 1990, as defined in the National Archives Act, 1986. Our brief is to collect material from the foundation of the State up until the present day,

Read More

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

image-1

A selection of 1916 resources from Scoilnet

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]


image4

Information on the leaders who were executed

[trx_line style=”solid” color=”#adc400″]

[trx_br]

The Irish Flag

Thomas-Francis-Meagher-194x300

Thomas Francis Meagher who unveiled the Irish Tricolour for the first time in March of 1848

“The Irish Tricolour is an emblem of peace and brotherhood between the various communites who live on the island of Ireland”

– Michael D Higgins – President of Ireland

The History of the Irish Flag

The Irish Tricolour is essentially a flag of union. It’s origin is to be sought in the history of the early nineteenth century and it is emblematic of the fusion of the older elements, represented by the green, with the newer elements, represented by the orange.

The combination of both colours in the tricolour, with the white between in token of brotherhood, symbolises the union of the different stocks in a common nationality. Irish tricolours were mentioned in 1830 and 1844, but widespread recognition was not accorded the flag until 1848.

From March of that year Irish tricolours appeared side by side with French ones at meetings held all over the country to celebrate the revolution that had just then taken place in France.

In April, Thomas Francis Meagher, a.k.a. Meagher of the Sword, the Young Ireland leader, brought a silk tricolour of orange, white and green from Paris and presented it to a  Dublin meeting. John Mitchel, referring to it, said: “I hope to see that flag one day waving as our national banner.” At that time, however, and for long afterwards, the national flag was the green one with a yellow or gold harp.

Although the tricolour was not forgotten as a symbol of union and a banner associated with the Young Irelanders, it was little used between 1848 and 1916. Even up to the eve of the Rising in 1916, the green flag with the gold harp held undisputed sway. Neither the colours nor the arrangement of the early tricolours was standardised. All of the 1848 tricolours showed green, white and orange, but orange was sometimes put next to the staff, and in at least one flag the order was orange, green and white.

In 1850 a flag of green for the Catholics, orange for the Protestants of the Establishment and blue for the Presbyterians was proposed. In 1883 a Parnellite tricolour of yellow, white and green, arranged horizontally, is recorded. Down to recent times yellow had occasionally been used instead of orange, but by this substitution the fundamental symbolism is destroyed.

Associated with the secession movement in the past, flown over the GPO during the Rising and capturing the banner of the new revolutionary Ireland, it was soon acclaimed throughout the country as the national flag. It continued to be recognised by official usage during the period 1922-1937, when its position as the national flag was formally confirmed by the Constitution of 1937, Article 7 of which states: “The national flag is the tricolour of green, white and orange.”

Here are some links about the Irish Flag

Fifteen Facts about  the Irish Flag

The Flag of Ireland

Scoilnet; The Flag

Article 7 Constitution Our National Flag